Membership (to the Uffizi) has its Privileges

Ciao Tutti!

As I have mentioned in a previous post, we became members of the Uffizi (Amici degli Uffizi).  As I have not mentioned in a previous post, we have been “popping in” on some of the world’s greatest art in between the projects and appointments.  That sounds so weird – but we have literally been “popping in” – just saying “Ciao” to Michelangelo’s David (at L’Accademia) and Botticelli’s Birth of Venus (at the Uffizi).  The Uffizi cards are too cool!  Not only do we walk past the long lines of folks without reservations (photo below), but also past the shorter lines of those with the knowledge/foresight to make reservations.  We literally just walk right up to the front, flash our cards, and get let in!  At the Accademia they opened the rope blocking the front door for us, which Steve likened to being super VIP’s at some swank night club.  I have to admit I felt many eyes on us today as we bypassed the pictured line and walked right in!

It’s a little surreal.  I remember the first time I saw these amazing works of art I stayed and stared – thinking it might be my only chance to ever see them.  That was 2006, and as Steve confirmed, not in a million years did he think at that time we would be living here (though I am guessing those thoughts at least entered my head).  Now, in stark contrast, we just “pop in,” knowing we can come back and view the other pieces at our leisure (and in cooler weather – it’s even HOT in the museums!).  I have decided to just try and absorb a few pieces a visit.  Today a piece I have never seen before caught my attention, as much for its name as for the art itself – “Saint Nicholas Resurrecting Youths who had been Pickled” (by Gentile da Fabriano, 1425) (yes, that says “pickled,” not a type-o). You can read the tale here.  No photos are allowed in the museums, though they do have a realistic (not) replica of David in the courtyard for photo purposes (below).  I am close to having tried enough gelato for a full review post…close….

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3 Comments

  1. Roger Kennett

     /  August 23, 2012

    Sperranza – I love your writing style so this is NOT a criticism. In my quest to bridge the gap of English to Italian common speak, I wonder how one says nel’italiano, “…and get let in.”
    –Roger “detto Orlando” Kennett

    Reply
    • Hi Roger! Thanks for reading and commenting. Funny, for very straight forward things google translate usually gets you by, but for more subtle expressions, not so much – see what you can find and so will I!

      Reply
  2. Roger Kennett

     /  August 24, 2012

    Maybe “ci offrono la entrada”, o “ci lasciano entrare”?

    Reply

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